Feedback: How to get it and why you need it

By: Caitlin Brison

Co-op – it’s learning by doing. Actually, it’s learning through reflection on doing.  During a co-op semester, students have the opportunity to work hands-on in a professional setting outside the classroom. The key ingredient that makes co-op a learning experience is feedback.  Feedback helps us correct errors and promotes self-reflection in order to improve our performance. It is essential to get feedback on the work you are doing. So don’t be afraid to ask for it!

Group of people talking

Ask for feedback in real time.

Giving feedback can be equally as uncomfortable for supervisors; some skip it because they worry how it will be received.  They hold off, then they dump negative feedback in a formal performance review and you never had the opportunity to change.  Create an atmosphere that welcomes it by having a good attitude and showing you are resilient. You can listen and adjust.

 

Help your boss be your coach, too.

Pose specific questions in real-time. It doesn’t have to be a formal sit-down meeting to have a coaching exchange. Asking vague questions can lead to vague feedback and nothing gets accomplished. While the work is still fresh, pose questions like “What’s one thing I could have done better on this project?”  It shows that you are investing in your own growth.

 

Ask for examples.

Vague feedback is futile and can be disheartening. Press for examples or ask targeted questions so that you can be made aware specifics and be encouraged to change. This will help you make adjustments and identify parts of your performance that may need major or micro adjustments.

 

Value input from your colleagues.

Don’t just look up for feedback – turn to your colleagues. Knowing how your colleagues view your strengths and developmental areas can be a really powerful tool. They may have insight your boss doesn’t!

 

Feedback can be a stressful experience, which is why many people hesitate to ask for it. But guess what? The more often you do, the more comfortable and impactful it becomes. With increased opportunities to adjust your work, the better you will be at your job and the higher you get reviewed. More feedback leads to higher performance and increased job satisfaction.

 

Learning how to get feedback on co-op sets you up for success your entire career. Feedback builds resiliency and helps you develop a growth mindset.  It’ll be a tool you always use and you’ll impress your future employers with the level of maturity and motivation you bring to your role.

 

Additional Resources:

How to Get the Feedback you Need: https://hbr.org/2015/05/how-to-get-the-feedback-you-need

The Assumptions Employees Make When They Don’t Get Feedback: https://hbr.org/2019/06/the-assumptions-employees-make-when-they-dont-get-feedback

As always, to make an appointment with your CO-OP + CAREER Advisor call the front desk at 617.989.4101 or stop by the CO-OPS + CAREERS Office.

Fall 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Guide to LinkedIn

By: Ria Kalinowski

LinkedIn is a social media networking site that allows people to connect with colleagues, peers, and industry professionals. Individuals highlight their skills, experience, and examples of work on an interactive platform.

Man searching through LinkedIn

Why Should I Use LinkedIn?

  • Visibility: 93% of industry recruiters use LinkedIn and your profile has the capacity to hold far more than your resume does.
  • Research: Millions of people across the world are using LinkedIn! You can view company pages to learn about company culture and see who works there on the “People” tab. Follow companies to see what they are talking about. You can look at interviewers’ backgrounds to get a better understanding about what types of questions they may ask during interviews.
  • Professional Networking: You have the power to connect with people based on shared interests and/or similar backgrounds. Reach out to alumni and join groups to ask industry specific questions. Comment and engage with others in groups. You will get noticed. Make sure it’s for the right reasons by acting professionally!

 

How can I use LinkedIn?

Promote your brand, highlight your accomplishments, connect with alumni and industry professionals, join groups, conduct informational interviews, engage with employers through discussion boards – the possibilities are endless.

 

How do I get started?

  • Create an account at linkedin.com.
  • Add information to your profile. Include as many sections as you think appropriate (education, experience, volunteer work, courses, and so on). Bring it to an All-Star Level using these suggestions: https://coopsandcareers.wit.edu/blog/2018/08/01/creating-an-all-star-profile-on-linkedin/.
  • Get your profile reviewed by your advisor. Just like your resume and cover letter, this is a professional marketing tool that should receive feedback before use.
  • Connect with classmates, colleagues, professors, friends, etc. And send them a personalized invitation.
  • Don’t stop now! Continue to update and add information to your LinkedIn account as you gain skills and experience.

 

Tips and Best Practices

  • Complete your profile because profiles that are complete show up higher in search results.
  • Think carefully about your headline. It doesn’t need to be your current title, but it must be relevant. Avoid “Student at Wentworth Institute of Technology” as that headline applies to over 4,000 students. Use your headline to stand out by focusing on your career goals or on your main skills.
  • Customize your URL. Do this while in edit mode and choose some iteration of your full name (ex: SamRSmith10).
  • Upload a professional, high-quality photo as profiles with photos get more views. Get your picture taken at the LinkedIn Photo Booth at the next Wentworth CO-OP + CAREER Fair or ask a friend with a quality camera. Please, no selfies!
  • Write a concise, thoughtful “About” section. What do you care about? Why are you on LinkedIn?
  • Add content to the “Accomplishments” section on your profile. Publications, Projects, Patents, Posts – share your work!
  • Utilize the Alumni tool on Wentworth’s page to identify alumni with whom you want to connect.
  • Personalize all requests to connect. Don’t just send the stock message – share information about who you are and why you’re reaching out.
  • Join groups and follow companies. Comment and engage with others on these platforms. You will get noticed.
  • LinkedIn is a professional platform. Do not spam or harass others. Post only work-place appropriate materials. This is not Facebook – respect the rules.
  • Recommend others (and get recommended in turn). Recommendations support your claims about skill level and professionalism in the workplace. Always offer to write one before you request one of others.
  • Don’t forget about the Skills & Endorsements section – google industry competencies and list the ones you possess.

 

NOTE: Remember to update your LinkedIn every few months. Never let the information get stale!

 

Additional Resources

Student sample LinkedIn profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/studentsample/

Examples of great LinkedIn “About” sections: https://www.linkedinsights.com/4-stunningly-good-linkedin-summaries/

How to write a good LinkedIn Headline: https://firebrandtalent.com/blog/2015/04/how-to-write-the-best-linkedin-headline-and-why-it-matters/

 

To make an appointment with your CO-OP + CAREER Advisor call the front desk at 617 989 4101 or stop by during Fall 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Co-op Stories: Caleb Grenier

By: Caleb Grenier

Before Caleb Grenier left campus after graduating in August 2019 from the Biomedical Engineering program, he graciously shared about his co-op experience with CO-OPS + CAREERS.

Caleb Headshot in CEIS Lobby

  • Where was your co-op?

My second co-op was a return to IDEXX Laboratories Technical Manufacturing department which I worked at during the optional co-op semester. My role was to investigate and update an SOP purification for Avian Influenza.

  • Why were you interested in returning to IDEXX Laboratories?

IDEXX’s R&D department is well known for developing revolutionary testing methods for diseased animals and livestock. The idea of working in a lab performing biochemical processes that contributed valuable research really sparked my interest.

  • What was a typical day like at your co-op?

I would get free coffee from the cafeteria when I arrived. I would then sit down and drink my coffee while either looking over any data I collected from the previous day or planning out an experiment for the day. I would then connect with my supervisor to see if he was okay with the procedure I came up with. I would then perform the experiment(s) for the rest of the work day.

  • While on co-op, what project(s) were you a part of that inspired you?

I was able to collect a lot of important data for the update of the Avian Influenza purification. I was truly inspired by the project and the people I was working with. At the end I gave the biggest presentation of my life to date. I felt a sense of accomplishment because I felt like I was able to contribute valuable work and knowledge to the team.

  • What did you need to focus on inside or outside of the classroom to be successful as a candidate?

Practicing professionalism and networking often outside of the classroom was important to securing this co-op in particular. In terms of being in the classroom, Biochemistry was the most important class I took before this co-op. It helped me have intelligent conversations about science, but it also helped me think critically about experimental design when it came to purification of virus.

  • What advice do you have for students interested in Bio Analytics and working for a company like IDEXX?

Unexpected experimental results are not indicative of failure, in fact unexpected experimental results are what makes you grow and think in ways that the past version of you didn’t.

Thank you for sharing your experience with us, Caleb! Be on the lookout for our next co-op feature. If you would like to share your co-op experience with us (positive or not-as-expected), or have any questions about the co-op process, please email us at coopsandcareers@wit.edu.

As always, to make an appointment with your CO-OP + CAREER Advisor call the front desk at 617.989.4101 or stop by the CO-OPS + CAREERS Office.

Fall 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Mock Interview Day 2019

By: Kristen Eckman

Our annual Mock Interview Day was held on Tuesday, October 22nd from 3:00pm –6:00pm in Watson Auditorium. The day consisted of five rounds of 35-minute interviews conducted by 20 employer representatives from companies across multiple industries. Of those 20 representatives, 6 were Wentworth alumni and 4 were Wentworth staff who helped to cover for employer cancellations.

In total, 68 students participated in 97 interviews out of a possible 100, providing an option for some students to conduct more than one practice interview. Many of the employer volunteers were impressed with the caliber of mock interviews and will be inviting students back for formal interviews.

Mock interview day

If you are a student who attended Mock Interview Day this week your next steps should be to follow up with employers by:

  • Sending a thank you email to the employers with whom you spoke. Find our guide to thank you notes here.
  • If a recruiter gave you specific instructions, be sure to follow through on those items and then follow up with the recruiter.
  • Unable to send a thank-you note for lack of contact information? Connect through social media by finding the company and the person you spoke with on LinkedIn or Twitter. Follow their feeds to stay up to date with new openings and other news!

Mock Interview Day

If you were unable to attend Mock Interview Day, be on the lookout for future opportunities to engage with employers and don’t miss the spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair, date TBD. Check WITworks as we get closer to the Spring Fair for updates on employers attending.

Employers – invitations for the spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair will be sent out in the new year. As always, stay up-to-date with news from CO-OPS + CAREERS and events happening on-campus through coopsandcareers.wit.edu.

Thank you to all students and employers who joined us on October 22nd to conduct practice interviews!

As always, to make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617.989.4101 or stop by the CO-OPS + CAREERS Office.

Fall 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Co-op Stories: James Bednar

By: James Bednar

James is a Wentworth senior in the Electromechanical Engineering program with minors in Applied Mathematics and Physics. He graciously shared his recent co-op experience with CO-OPS + CAREERS:

  • Where was your co-op?

My co-op this summer has been at Hanscom Air Force Base, which is predominantly located within the city of Bedford, Massachusetts. I’ve been working as a SMART Program Intern for the Enterprise IT and Cyber Infrastructure Division of the Command, Control, Communications, Intelligence, and Networks (C3I&N) Program Office.

The majority of the work at Hanscom AFB is in support of the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC), which is responsible for acquiring, sustaining, and eventually disposing of complex systems utilized by the Air Force.

Within my assigned organization, engineers are responsible for ensuring that IT and cyber systems are designed, acquired, and sustained in a manner that allows the entire Air Force to benefit from modern information systems. This poses a unique challenge, especially for organizations as large and geographically dispersed as the U.S. military.

 

  • What was your search and interview process like?

My co-op search was unique in the sense that it mainly consisted of a traditional scholarship application. After collecting the references, transcripts, and essays required to apply to SMART, I waited to see whether or not I would be offered a place within the program.

While applicants can list their preferences for potential work assignments, there’s no guarantee that they will get assigned to any of their top choices. I ended up being very fortunate, as I was both offered a spot in the SMART Scholarship Program and assigned to AFLCMC at Hanscom AFB, which was my first choice when applying to the program.

  • What is the SMART Scholarship Program?

The Science Mathematics and Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship-for-Service Program is an initiative led by the Department of Defense seeking to provide college students with a pathway into civil service. The SMART Program offers college funding opportunities at the Bachelors, Masters, and Doctoral level in exchange for working as a Department of Defense civilian employee for a few years upon graduation.

When explaining the program, I tell people that the SMART Program is analogous to a civilian ROTC program, where students are contracted to work for one year as a civilian engineer for each year they receive financial assistance from the program. It’s an imperfect analogy, but helps to capture the fact that program participants typically want to pursue civilian service as their chosen career pathway.

  • How did you learn about SMART?

I learned about the SMART Scholarship Program shortly before entering my freshman year at Wentworth. Initially, I was accepted and planned on attending the United States Coast Guard Academy but was medically disqualified at the last minute due to an injury received during basketball practice towards the end of high school.

Wentworth was always my top choice outside of Coast Guard, so I decided to move out to Boston with the hope of finding another way to pursue service in a civilian capacity. After eventually settling on the major of Electromechanical Engineering, I decided to apply to SMART during my sophomore year and was fortunate enough to be accepted into the program.

  • Why are you interested in this work/completing your co-op with your employer?

I have wanted to pursue service in some capacity since my freshman year of high school. The SMART Program provides a great introduction to government service within the Department of Defense, which I hope to build upon as I continue throughout my career.

Long term, I want to apply my technical experience to the field of public policy, and starting my career at Hanscom AFB will provide a great introduction to the crossroads of engineering and acquisitions policy as it pertains to the Air Force. Furthermore, I hope the opportunity to work on enterprise information systems will help inform my decision as I look to study either Applied Physics or Systems Engineering in graduate school.

  • What is a typical day like at your co-op?

A typical day will vary widely depending on what stage a system is its lifecycle. While I’ve been focusing on getting a feel for the organization on-the-job training and shadowing during this co-op, I’m looking forward to working on some exciting systems as I move forward at Hanscom AFB.

  • What advice do you have for students interested in pursuing the SMART scholarship?

First, I would encourage students interested in pursuing this opportunity (or work as a technical professional in any government organization) to “know your why”. Working as an engineer on the civilian side of the Department of Defense (or any area of the government) offers some unique opportunities you simply will not find anywhere else, and the work can be very rewarding. However, working as a civil servant is different than a career in private industry. Knowing why you decided to pursue civil service can help provide perspective when you have those inevitable “what if” moments when talking to friends working in private industry.

More importantly, if you’re truly interested in what the SMART Program has to offer, my biggest advice would be to go for it. The SMART Program provides a fantastic opportunity, and it would be great to see other Wentworth students pursue the program along with me. If anyone out there is interested in SMART or has any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me, either around campus or via email.

Thank you for sharing your experience with us, James! Be on the lookout for our next co-op feature. If you would like to share your co-op experience (positive or not-as-expected), or have any questions about the co-op process, please email us at coopsandcareers@wit.edu.

As always, to make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617.989.4101 or stop by the CO-OPS + CAREERS Office.

Fall 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

CO-OP + CAREER Fair Event Recap

By: Abbey Pober

Our annual Fall CO-OP + CAREER Fair was held on Tuesday, October 2nd from 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm in Tansey Gymnasium. The event hosted 180 employers ranging from local design firms to international technology organizations and everything in between. It was our most well attended Fair to date, drawing 875 students from all majors, seeking both co-op and full-time opportunities. Students came prepared to spend the afternoon learning and making new connections.

Fall Career Fair

Students who attended the CO-OP + CAREER Fair, below are some tips for following up. If you had a LinkedIn photo taken, look for an email from coopsandcareers@wit.edu in about a month.

  • Send a thank you email to the employers with whom you spoke. Find our guide to thank you notes here. If you need a reminder of which companies with whom you spoke a list of employers is available on our website for reference. Use this opportunity to include a copy of your resume, even if you gave them one at the Fair.
  • If a recruiter gave you specific instructions, be sure to follow through on those items and then follow up with the recruiter.
  • Unable to send a thank-you note for lack of contact information? Stay connected through social media: find the company or even the person you spoke with on LinkedIn or Twitter. Follow their feeds to stay up to date on new openings and other news!
  • You are always welcome to check in with your Co-op + Career Advisor to see if they can provide you with any helpful information, too.

Fall Career Fair Booths

If you were unable to attend the Fair be on the lookout for future opportunities to connect with employers, including the announcement about the spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair. Our next event is Mock Interview Day, on October 22nd , and student registration is now open on WITworks. This is a great opportunity to practice your interview skills and get feedback directly from employers.

Employers, be on the lookout for future recruiting opportunities in the coming months, and for details about our spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair. Interested in participating in Mock Interview Day? Register for this free event through your WITworks account or by contacting Chris McIntyre, mintyrec@wit.edu.

Thank you to everyone who joined on October 2nd for the Fair. A special thank you to our sponsors: BOND BrothersCommodore BuildersDACONElectric Supply Center, NOVO Construction, Schneider Electric, and TG Gallagher. Your support makes all the difference.

 

We look forward to seeing everyone at our next event!

How to Prepare for CO-OP + CAREER Fair

By: Caitlin Brison

How to WORK the Career Fair – An approach for everyone, whether you are low-key or EXTRA!

CO-OP + CAREER Fair Spring 2019

Low Key Approach EXTRA Approach
RESEARCH •   Find the list of employers attending on the “Jobs and Careers” App and research the ones of interest.

•   See if they have positions posted so you can research more about the companies ahead of the fair.

•      Create a spreadsheet, categorizing employers into A, B, and C lists.

•      Write down a few questions you might ask them at the fair. Refer to these questions before each conversation.

RESUME •   Write, review, and edit your resume.

•   Come to Drop-Ins to make sure it is ready for the Career Fair.

•   Print out 10-20 copies and tuck them in a folder to hand out to employers.

•      Make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor to go over your Resume.

•      Print 10-20 copies and carry them in a professional padfolio.

•      Make your own business cards.

PLAN •   The plan is to go, shake hands, meet employers, ask good questions, and hand out resumes.  Go with it!

 

•      Locate the employer booths on the Fairs App ahead of time and map out your route.

•      Maybe talk to a couple employers on your C list to start before moving on to your first choices!

DRESS •   Gather your professional attire.

•   Visit WITwear to borrow any items you may need!

 

•      Iron, steam, fresh haircut!  Look your best.

•      Also…visit WITwear to borrow any items you need.

PITCH •   Build a 30 second pitch and practice it in the mirror so you come across relaxed and professional.

•   Practice a firm handshake.

 

•      Record yourself and critique yourself.  Be mindful of eye contact, fidgets, and filler (“um, like”).

•      Pitch with a friend and practice your handshakes.

THANK YOU •   Shake employers’ hand and thank them for their time answering your questions and speaking to you.

 

•   Collect business cards so you can write thank you notes the next day.

•   If they requested your application electronically – email them to let them know you applied.

 

Check out ALL our helpful guides on resumes, networking, pitches, and more on our website: https://coopsandcareers.wit.edu/resources/

Download the WITworks, “Symplicity Jobs and Careers App”:

Apple App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/symplicity-jobs-and-careers/id1239828027?mt=8

Google Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.symplicity.csmandroid&hl=en_US

Image of a smiling leopard.
TFW you nail the CO-OP + CAREER Fair

Limited time only: CO-OP + CAREER Fair All Day Resume Drop-Ins:  Fri 9/27 & Mon 9/30 in the Library and CO-OPS + CAREERS Office, 10am-4pm.

Make an appointment with your CO-OP + CAREER Advisor: call the front desk at (617) 989 4101 or stop by our office, Wentworth Hall first floor across from Admissions.

Fall 2019 WITwear Hours: M-Th 4-8pm & F 10am-Noon

Extended WITwear Hours: Mon & Tues 9/30-10/1 12-8pm Wed 10/2 10am-4pm

What Jobs Can I Get With a Major in Computer Information Systems?

By: STEAM Boston Team

Computer Information Systems (CIS) is a growing Information Technology (IT) discipline that is getting a lot of attention nowadays. There is plenty of entry-level jobs for Computer Information Systems graduates. It also has an excellent long-term outlook. For example, the demand for Computer and Information Systems Managers is supposed to grow 12 percent between 2016-2026. That’s a faster growth rate than the average for all occupations. So, a CIS degree can offer you a high-earning, satisfying long-term career.

CIS – Understanding the Business of Technology

Computer with glasses in front

Computer technology is a vast field with many disciplines and sub-disciplines. So students often struggle to understand what a Computer Information Systems degree means for them. Also, it’s easy to confuse Computer Science and Computer Information Systems degrees.

A Computer Science (CS) degree is intended for students who want to pursue hardcore computer programming. It teaches you how to build software. The emphasis is on math and problem-solving for software creation. However, in real-world environments, most companies don’t develop their software. They purchase ready-made applications from vendors and then customize them for their business requirements. The business of choosing the right software and customization requires less computer programming skills and more understanding of business needs. Computer Information Systems curriculums are designed to teach students how to use the right technology effectively for businesses.

In a Computer Information Systems major, you will learn about topics like system analysis, information architecture, information organization and management, and business consulting. You will be able to help businesses choose the right technology.

Types of Entry-Level Jobs You Can Get

A CIS major opens up many job options for you. Here are some entry-level jobs for Computer Information Systems (CIS) graduates:

Technical Support Specialist or Help Desk – Technical support specialists help users with software and hardware problems. You will assist customers with your technical know-how. You will use both your customer service skills and computer knowledge to solve everyday problems. The median income is around $49,595.

Business/Systems Analyst or Consultant – As a business/systems analyst, you’ll look at a company’s current operations and help them implement new systems or improve the current ones. The median income of a business/systems analyst is around $68,146.

Network/System Administrator – Network/system administrators are responsible for the implementation, management, and maintenance of the network infrastructure of a business. It requires both hardware and software knowledge. Network administrator median salary is around $57,747.

Database Administrator – Database administrators look after the design and maintenance of database systems. It requires an understanding of databases and how to protect data through backups and redundancies. The median salary for database administrators is around $71,833.

Web Developer or Programmer – Web developers help businesses with their websites. A web developer’s responsibilities include gathering business requirements, designing websites, implementing solutions and maintaining already running websites. Depending on your interest, you can work on the design side or the programming side of web development. The median salary for a web developer is around $58,483.

Educational Opportunities in the Greater Boston Area

The greater Boston area has lots of great colleges and universities that have CIS majors. Institutions like Wentworth Institute of TechnologyNortheastern UniversityBentley UniversityUniversity of Massachusetts – Boston and more provide excellent Computer Information Systems (CIS) degrees to start your career.

References:

Interested in joining the STEAM Boston Community, then visit this link: https://community.steamboston.com/

You will have the opportunity to expand your network and connect with students & professionals in the STEAM field in the Greater Boston area.

This story was originally posted on STEAM Boston’s blog site. Original story here: https://www.steamboston.com/what-jobs-can-i-get-with-a-major-in-computer-information-systems/

Dahnaya Joyner – My Journey of Becoming a Web Developer

By: Will Ma
Dahnaya Joyner in graduation attire
Photo Courtesy of Dahnaya Joyner (STEAM Boston)

Tell us a little about yourself.

My name is Dahnaya Joyner and right now I am a Web Developer. I graduated from Wentworth Institute of Technology with a degree in Computer Engineering Technology in 2017. I have always been interested in engineering and technology. Computer Engineering Technology is solely hardware-based engineering, but I switched over to the software side. I’m loving software now, so I’m glad I made the switch.

What got you interested in Computer Engineering Technology?

Growing up, I have always been fascinated by how things work. I have taken a lot of things apart and tried to put them back together. I have always been interested in technology and the Computer Engineering Technology degree was the right decision at the moment. I then transitioned to software and I don’t work on hardware as much now.

Tell us more about your transition to software.

I got my degree in Computer Engineering Technology, the summer of 2017. I got a full-time job right out of college and I eventually found out that the job was right for me. The job didn’t make me happy and I had to pivot to something that gave me career fulfillment. After six months, I ended up getting laid off and that moment was bad. Everything hits you at once and it was a bad time. Being a blessing in disguise, it allowed me to take time off and really try to find what I really wanted to do.

I knew I wanted to stay in tech and go into the software route. I did research online and I found out about coding boot camps. I ended going to General Assembly for web development and now I have a job in web development. I’m very happy with my decision to go to a coding boot camp and work in a job I really like.

General Assembly was a really hard coding boot camp and it was intense. There were a lot of times that I thought I wouldn’t graduate and make it through the program. There was a huge support system and everyone in the class are going through the same struggles. It was a great experience and once I graduated, I felt prepared and ready to enter the field.

What advice do you have for students looking to get into web development?

There are a lot of online resources for web development, so I’d definitely utilize that. You could go to college for web development, but there are definitely cheaper ways. There are coding boot camps now and you should do your research on which one that fits your needs.

Where do you see yourself in 1-2 years?

I definitely still want to do web development and I’m still learning. I’m working in a team where everyone is supportive and I can learn so much. In 1-2 years, I envision myself becoming a more experienced web developer and being the best version of myself.

Any wise words of wisdom to the STEAM Boston community?

Don’t give up. I got laid off my first job and I was in a really bad position. I took the time to find out what I really wanted to do and I’m happy to be a web developer now. Also, imposter syndrome is very real. I deal with it often. But no matter where you are in your journey just know that you’re not doing it for anything and it’ll all pay off.

I also want to shout out my parents. “I’m very thankful to my parents for their constant support. Making a career change is a very difficult decision but I am fortunate to have a great foundation that allowed me to do that. I love you guys!”


Interested in joining the STEAM Boston Community, then visit this link: https://community.steamboston.com/

You will have the opportunity to expand your network and connect with students & professionals in the STEAM field in the Greater Boston area.

This story was originally posted on STEAM Boston’s blog site. Original story here: https://www.steamboston.com/dahnaya-joyner-my-journey-of-becoming-a-web-developer/

 

Co-op Stories: Kelsey Degouveia

By: Kelsey Degouveia

Kelsey is a recent Wentworth graduate of the Biomedical Engineering program with a minor in Biology. Looking back on her time at Wentworth, she shared with us about her very first co-op experience:

  • Tell us about your co-op at Wyss Institute:

My first co-op was at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. I got to work side by side with a graduate student in the Ingber Lab studying metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer in microfluidic devices. As a Research Associate, I helped a lot with imaging, data analysis, and pharmaceutical comparing chemotherapy with novel treatment drugs. For my sophomore optional co-op, junior year co-op and senior year co-op I was a Research Associate in the Manalis Lab at the Koch Institute at MIT. During my time at MIT, I have had the opportunity to study circulating tumor cells (CTCs) with an optofluidic platform, in real-time, from a small cell lung cancer mouse model. I am involved in the fabrication of microfluidic devices and supplies, maintaining and handling our mouse colony and analysis of tumors cells collected. I have also had the opportunity to explore independent projects using deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices and suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) to investigate size separation and growth of CTCs.

KelseyDeGouveia in lab

  • Why were you interested in completing your co-op in the role?

I was interested in joining a research lab because I was curious about medicine and thought I wanted to solve the mysteries of cancer and other diseases. Ultimately research has helped me find my passion for medicine.

  • While on co-op, what project were you a part of, or something that you worked on, that has inspired you? 

I think being a part of a team that is using optics and microfluidics to study biological questions has been so inspiring because it is the perfect balance of my interest in science and education in engineering. The system has been used in so many different collaborations and has allowed me to meet many great researchers and learn about different fields of cancer research. The first project I worked on in the lab, that focused on longitudinal measurements of our SCLC model led to my first publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

  • How did you decide you wanted to pursue med-school?

During my first year at Wentworth, I thought research would be the perfect avenue for me to discover the unknown of different disease like cancer and Alzheimer’s disease, but I ultimately realized, after a few years in research labs, that I wanted to help people now, in the moment, and not just work towards a cure for the future.

  • What resources have you found helpful in your application and search process?

Colleges with pre-med tracks have online resources posted for their pre-med students along with helpful information provided by the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) on medical school requirements and virtual medical school fairs that let you chat with admission representatives from schools all over the country. Surprisingly, Reddit had a ton of helpful information on people’s study tips for the MCAT and people talking about their pre-med journey.

  • What is the application/search process like?

The application process is very interesting because each school is unique but great in their own way. I think that for me it has been helpful to make a list of the things that I want in my medical school experience and searching for schools that match that criteria, like a school with great opportunities to continue doing research.

  • What advice do you have for students interested in pursuing med-school?

I think the most helpful thing is to get a head start on communicating with physicians, and other pre-med/medical school student older than you. Developing a relationship with mentor is a fantastic resource for advice, a way to build your network, and someone who can help you understand a very long and difficult process.

Thank you for sharing your experience with us, Kelsey! Be on the lookout for our next co-op feature. If you would like to share your co-op experience (positive or not-as-expected), or have any questions about the co-op process, please email us at coopsandcareers@wit.edu.

As always, to make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617.989.4101 or stop by the CO-OPS + CAREERS Office.

Fall 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.