Is Your Class Active and Engaging?

Most germane to learning, research shows that students need to do more Reading, Writing, and Presenting (Schmoker 2011). Research has demonstrated, for example, that if a faculty member allows students to consolidate their notes by pausing three times for two minutes each during a lecture, students will learn significantly more information (Ruhl, Hughes, and Schloss […]

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Why Flip Your Classroom?

Can’t seem to cover all the material you need to in class? Just not enough time to have the needed discussion in class to prompt deeper learning.  Well, you’re not alone. So, how can you make the most out of a 50 or 75-minute lecture?  “Flip” your class. Have your students view the material or […]

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Creating the Active Classroom 201

Last month our “Creating the Active Classroom 101” blog addressed some easy methods faculty could implement into your class with minimal disruption to your current teaching style. This month LIT would like to share more active classroom methods that build on last month’s 101. To facilitate student involvement, reflection, interaction, and enjoyment in the learning […]

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Creating the Active Classroom 101

Promoting an active classroom doesn’t require a lot of major changes to your current teaching style. What it does require is incorporating simple engagement techniques that get your students up, moving, and interacting with your classroom content. “Students generally have difficulty connecting abstract knowledge with real-life applications” (Glaser & Struss, 1967). Providing your students with […]

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