Guide to LinkedIn

By: Ria Kalinowski

LinkedIn is a social media networking site that allows people to connect with colleagues, peers, and industry professionals. Individuals highlight their skills, experience, and examples of work on an interactive platform.

Man searching through LinkedIn

Why Should I Use LinkedIn?

  • Visibility: 93% of industry recruiters use LinkedIn and your profile has the capacity to hold far more than your resume does.
  • Research: Millions of people across the world are using LinkedIn! You can view company pages to learn about company culture and see who works there on the “People” tab. Follow companies to see what they are talking about. You can look at interviewers’ backgrounds to get a better understanding about what types of questions they may ask during interviews.
  • Professional Networking: You have the power to connect with people based on shared interests and/or similar backgrounds. Reach out to alumni and join groups to ask industry specific questions. Comment and engage with others in groups. You will get noticed. Make sure it’s for the right reasons by acting professionally!

 

How can I use LinkedIn?

Promote your brand, highlight your accomplishments, connect with alumni and industry professionals, join groups, conduct informational interviews, engage with employers through discussion boards – the possibilities are endless.

 

How do I get started?

  • Create an account at linkedin.com.
  • Add information to your profile. Include as many sections as you think appropriate (education, experience, volunteer work, courses, and so on). Bring it to an All-Star Level using these suggestions: https://coopsandcareers.wit.edu/blog/2018/08/01/creating-an-all-star-profile-on-linkedin/.
  • Get your profile reviewed by your advisor. Just like your resume and cover letter, this is a professional marketing tool that should receive feedback before use.
  • Connect with classmates, colleagues, professors, friends, etc. And send them a personalized invitation.
  • Don’t stop now! Continue to update and add information to your LinkedIn account as you gain skills and experience.

 

Tips and Best Practices

  • Complete your profile because profiles that are complete show up higher in search results.
  • Think carefully about your headline. It doesn’t need to be your current title, but it must be relevant. Avoid “Student at Wentworth Institute of Technology” as that headline applies to over 4,000 students. Use your headline to stand out by focusing on your career goals or on your main skills.
  • Customize your URL. Do this while in edit mode and choose some iteration of your full name (ex: SamRSmith10).
  • Upload a professional, high-quality photo as profiles with photos get more views. Get your picture taken at the LinkedIn Photo Booth at the next Wentworth CO-OP + CAREER Fair or ask a friend with a quality camera. Please, no selfies!
  • Write a concise, thoughtful “About” section. What do you care about? Why are you on LinkedIn?
  • Add content to the “Accomplishments” section on your profile. Publications, Projects, Patents, Posts – share your work!
  • Utilize the Alumni tool on Wentworth’s page to identify alumni with whom you want to connect.
  • Personalize all requests to connect. Don’t just send the stock message – share information about who you are and why you’re reaching out.
  • Join groups and follow companies. Comment and engage with others on these platforms. You will get noticed.
  • LinkedIn is a professional platform. Do not spam or harass others. Post only work-place appropriate materials. This is not Facebook – respect the rules.
  • Recommend others (and get recommended in turn). Recommendations support your claims about skill level and professionalism in the workplace. Always offer to write one before you request one of others.
  • Don’t forget about the Skills & Endorsements section – google industry competencies and list the ones you possess.

 

NOTE: Remember to update your LinkedIn every few months. Never let the information get stale!

 

Additional Resources

Student sample LinkedIn profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/studentsample/

Examples of great LinkedIn “About” sections: https://www.linkedinsights.com/4-stunningly-good-linkedin-summaries/

How to write a good LinkedIn Headline: https://firebrandtalent.com/blog/2015/04/how-to-write-the-best-linkedin-headline-and-why-it-matters/

 

To make an appointment with your CO-OP + CAREER Advisor call the front desk at 617 989 4101 or stop by during Fall 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

What Jobs Can I Get With a Major in Computer Information Systems?

By: STEAM Boston Team

Computer Information Systems (CIS) is a growing Information Technology (IT) discipline that is getting a lot of attention nowadays. There is plenty of entry-level jobs for Computer Information Systems graduates. It also has an excellent long-term outlook. For example, the demand for Computer and Information Systems Managers is supposed to grow 12 percent between 2016-2026. That’s a faster growth rate than the average for all occupations. So, a CIS degree can offer you a high-earning, satisfying long-term career.

CIS – Understanding the Business of Technology

Computer with glasses in front

Computer technology is a vast field with many disciplines and sub-disciplines. So students often struggle to understand what a Computer Information Systems degree means for them. Also, it’s easy to confuse Computer Science and Computer Information Systems degrees.

A Computer Science (CS) degree is intended for students who want to pursue hardcore computer programming. It teaches you how to build software. The emphasis is on math and problem-solving for software creation. However, in real-world environments, most companies don’t develop their software. They purchase ready-made applications from vendors and then customize them for their business requirements. The business of choosing the right software and customization requires less computer programming skills and more understanding of business needs. Computer Information Systems curriculums are designed to teach students how to use the right technology effectively for businesses.

In a Computer Information Systems major, you will learn about topics like system analysis, information architecture, information organization and management, and business consulting. You will be able to help businesses choose the right technology.

Types of Entry-Level Jobs You Can Get

A CIS major opens up many job options for you. Here are some entry-level jobs for Computer Information Systems (CIS) graduates:

Technical Support Specialist or Help Desk – Technical support specialists help users with software and hardware problems. You will assist customers with your technical know-how. You will use both your customer service skills and computer knowledge to solve everyday problems. The median income is around $49,595.

Business/Systems Analyst or Consultant – As a business/systems analyst, you’ll look at a company’s current operations and help them implement new systems or improve the current ones. The median income of a business/systems analyst is around $68,146.

Network/System Administrator – Network/system administrators are responsible for the implementation, management, and maintenance of the network infrastructure of a business. It requires both hardware and software knowledge. Network administrator median salary is around $57,747.

Database Administrator – Database administrators look after the design and maintenance of database systems. It requires an understanding of databases and how to protect data through backups and redundancies. The median salary for database administrators is around $71,833.

Web Developer or Programmer – Web developers help businesses with their websites. A web developer’s responsibilities include gathering business requirements, designing websites, implementing solutions and maintaining already running websites. Depending on your interest, you can work on the design side or the programming side of web development. The median salary for a web developer is around $58,483.

Educational Opportunities in the Greater Boston Area

The greater Boston area has lots of great colleges and universities that have CIS majors. Institutions like Wentworth Institute of TechnologyNortheastern UniversityBentley UniversityUniversity of Massachusetts – Boston and more provide excellent Computer Information Systems (CIS) degrees to start your career.

References:

Interested in joining the STEAM Boston Community, then visit this link: https://community.steamboston.com/

You will have the opportunity to expand your network and connect with students & professionals in the STEAM field in the Greater Boston area.

This story was originally posted on STEAM Boston’s blog site. Original story here: https://www.steamboston.com/what-jobs-can-i-get-with-a-major-in-computer-information-systems/

4 Ways Younger Job Seekers Can Step Up as Baby Boomers Retire

By: Val Matta

Baby boomers have always been defined by their sheer numbers. Even now, as they reach retirement age, 41 million baby boomers are still working according to a 2018 report from the Pew Research Center. This equals out to them still accounting for a quarter of the workforce.

As more and more retire, there will be opportunities for younger job seekers to step up and assume the baby boomers’ responsibilities. But first, you’re going to have to prove you’re ready to take the next step in your career.

By understanding what employers want, both at your current company or another one, you can present yourself in the best light. Here are some tips to landing a job previously held by a baby boomer and ensuring you can take ownership of a role without missing a step:

Advancing at Your Current Company

If your current organization is a great fit, you might want to make a move without leaving the team. For both you and the company this is a win-win situation. You get career advancement, and your company doesn’t lose a talented employee. Make the most of your situation by taking the following steps:

Find a mentor

Having a mentor is essential to young job seekers’ careers. Older employees who have been where you are will provide valuable advice to help you learn and make better decisions. Plus, as boomers retire, having one as a mentor will put you on their radar to recommend as a possible replacement.

But to get the right mentor you need to be proactive. It’s rare that an experienced employee will approach you with an opportunity. Start by making a list of people in your organization who you already have a relationship. To evaluate if they could be a good mentor, consider:

  • Their accomplishments and if they are something you aspire to
  • How their personality meshes with yours
  • If they will push you to grow and develop
  • How available they typically are
  • Their connections within the organization and outside of it

Once you have a list of potential mentors, invite your top choice for coffee and have a conversation about what you’re looking for. Explain what your career plan is and how you think they can help. The more specific you can be the better. It helps them understand exactly what they’d be providing you.

Ask what positions are opening soon

Employees don’t retire without notice. It takes planning and conversations with company managers and leaders, helping everyone prepare for the transition. However, while upcoming retirements aren’t secrets, you may not be told about coming opportunities.

Talk to your manager about your interest in moving up in the company. Don’t say ‘I want Janet’s job when she retires.’ Instead, explain you’re ready for a new challenge and ask for their feedback on what you can do to prepare and train.

If you’re not ready to take over the retiring baby boomer’s position, suggest ways you can take on some, but not all, of the responsibilities. This will help you expand your role without setting yourself up for failure.

Manager stock photo

Advancing at Another Company

Sometimes the right move for your career is changing companies and making a fresh start. You will still need to prove you have what it takes to fill a more advanced position, however, you’ll approach the situation differently than if you were already in-house.

Look for jobs the “old school” way

In recent years, companies have turned to social media to recruit younger talent. However, don’t forget companies still use traditional job boards to reach older job seekers — especially for non-entry level positions.

Don’t neglect the old school ways to find a new job opportunity. Consider adding the following to your job search:

  • In-person networking events
  • Niche job boards
  • Job fairs

Find out what skills the company is blindly missing

Hiring younger job seekers presents employers with a unique opportunity to fill a position while getting a new set of skills. However, when an employee has performed a job for a long time, the organization may not be aware of alternate skills and ways to grow the role. While baby boomers have experience, a trending concern for years has been that not all have the latest skills.

When you’re researching positions, identify the skills that might be useful yet are not in the job description. Look at as many job descriptions from the organization (even those not for your specific department), as well as comparable positions at other companies. Use that to identify any trends of skills the company could inadvertently not be looking for in their job description.

Then, when you’re writing cover letters, updating your resume, and in the interview process, showcase the experience you have as well as how these additional skills could improve the team and bring greater value to the company.

Team stock photo

Want to find out more ways to land a more advanced job? Check out this blog piece!

Blog originally posted to: https://careershift.com/blog/2019/04/4-ways-younger-job-seekers-can-step-up-as-baby-boomers-retire/

 

Navigating Job Offers

By: Becky Smith

You get an offer from a company and you are glad…except you wish you had more time to decide!

Good news: It is normal – even common — to ask for time to think things over! It is just a matter of maintaining trust and using savvy communication skills.

It is strongly advised that you reply to an offer of employment within 24 hours.

  • Be positive to maintain the confidence that the hiring manager has in you: Act excited. Thank the hiring manager or recruiter for offering the job to you.

Ask if you can have some time to think about it.

  • You don’t have to say why; just say you need some time to consider all of the factors. In fact, the reasons why can sometimes make employers feel uncomfortable – it can come across wrong, and/or they are not prepared to be involved in your personal life.

Be sure to clearly communicate when you will get back to the employer with an answer, and keep your word no matter what.

  • You may ask for up to a week to think about the offer.
  • The company may need an answer sooner. Settle on a mutually convenient date.

This kind of negotiation is fair, given that they don’t want to lose other candidates while they are waiting to hear from you.

During the time you have negotiated, you may speak with your Co-op + Career Advisor, your faculty, your family, and other prospective employers. You may take some time to reflect on what you want and need (i.e., salary, start date, schedule).It is best to take your time to prepare if you are going to negotiate any of the terms of employment.

Be Aware of Common Misunderstandings:

Interviewing for a job does not mean committing to the job. Interviewing is exploration to determine whether you are a fit for the job…and whether the job and company are a fit for you.

If a co-op employer offers you an opportunity to return for a second co-op or a full-time job, you are not obligated to return. Be appreciative and respectfully consider the opportunity, but if it is not right for you, politely decline. Things are not going to turn out well for anyone if you accept a job that you know is wrong – including headaches for professionals with whom you’ve built relationships!

You do not need to accept the first job you are offered. You do need to reply to all offers within 24 hours.

For more information on how to navigate a situation in which you get an offer for one job but you’re really waiting to hear from another company, read our handout about Deliberating Job Offers.

As always we encourage you to stop by CO-OPS + CAREERS to discuss your co-op and job offer questions with any Co-op + Career Advisor. You can make an appointment or swing by summer drop-in hours, held every Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 2:00 – 4:00 PM. Stop by 101 Wentworth Hall, or contact us via email at coopsandcareers@wit.edu, or by calling 617-989-4101. We look forward to connecting with you soon!

The Fall 2017 CO-OP + CAREER Fair

By: Chawney Weis & Abbey Pober

Our second annual Fall CO-OP + CAREER Fair was held on Tuesday, October 3rd from 2:30pm – 6:00pm in both Watson Auditorium and Tansey Gymnasium. This was the first time we held this event in two locations, with 214 employers in attendance. These employers ranged from small local construction firms to international high-tech organizations and everything in between. The buzz about campus surrounding the employers attending drew more than 850 students from all majors, seeking both co-op and full-time positions, to The Fair.

If you are a student who attended the CO-OP + CAREER Fair last week your next steps should be to follow up with employers by:

-Sending a thank you email to the employers with whom you spoke. Find our guide to thank you notes here. If you need a reminder of which companies with whom you spoke The Fairs App is still available for reference.
-If a recruiter gave you specific instructions, be sure to follow through on those items and then follow up with the recruiter.
-Use this opportunity to include a copy of your resume, even if you gave them one at the Fair.
-Unable to send a thank-you note for lack of contact information? Stay connected with social media: find the company or even the person you spoke with on LinkedIn or Twitter. Follow their feeds to stay up to date on new openings and other news!

If you were unable to attend the Fair this fall don’t miss the spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair on March 20th, 2018. Check The Fairs App as we get closer to the Spring Fair for updates on employers attending.

Employers, be on the lookout for future recruiting opportunities, including Mock Interview Day on November 7th, and our spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair on March 20th.

Thank you to all students and employers who joined on October 3rd for The Fair. A special thank you to our sponsors: Bowdin Construction, Dacon, Bond Brothers, dck Worldwide, Electric Supply Center, Teradyne, Novo Construction, PROCON, Timberline Construction Company, and the Wentworth Alumni Association. Your support makes all the difference.
We look forward to seeing everyone in the spring.