Place-Bound Job Search

By: Lauren Creamer

There are many reasons a person might not be able to travel to or relocate for a job opportunity, the most common among them being 1) not having the ability to drive or access to a car, and 2) living at home, away from Boston.

This doesn’t mean you won’t be able to find a co-op– it just means you need to be strategic in your search and start as far in advance as possible.

If you know in advance that you will be confined to a relatively small geographic area, you should consider the state of the employment market for your discipline. Let’s consider the following example.

Student driving car

You are a biomedical engineering student who lives on-campus and doesn’t have a car. While the biotech industry is booming in Boston and Cambridge, there are many start-ups and small companies that don’t have the bandwidth or financials to support a co-op student.

What can you do in advance to identify hard-to-find opportunities in the city?

You can network at off-campus events. You can reach out to alumni through LinkedIn. You can apply to the Massachusetts Life Sciences Internship Challenge. You can go to the career fairs of other schools (yes, many will let you in even if you are not a student!). All of these avenues take time and effort to explore, so starting early is critical for your success.

The same is true for being place-bound to a suburban or rural area. You may have access to a car here, but what is the market like? Another example. You are an architecture student who needs to be home for your co-op semester due to a financial hardship. You live in suburban Connecticut and the firm options are few and far between. Again, you need to start early. Use resources like the Connecticut chapter of AIA to identify firms within reasonable driving distance. Talk with your advisor about less common options like working in construction or construction management.

Connection through phone

I have seen students land great co-ops that meet their geographic restrictions and I have seen students truly struggle. The difference is in how prepared they were for their search.

I recommend incorporating the following actions into your search to yield maximum return:

  • Apply to job postings early and often. Use the job search sites that make sense for you (location specific sites, generic sites that have location filtering options, professional organizations for your region, etc.).
  • Follow-up within one to two weeks – on the phone, if you can.
  • Make cold calls to inquire about potential opportunities, even if nothing is listed on a company’s site.
  • Use your network – and Wentworth’s network – to identify opportunities.
  • Connect with alumni on LinkedIn and build a relationship through informational interviews (do this early, so you can inquire about jobs at the right time).
  • Ask your Co-op + Career Advisor if they know anyone else who has gone through a similar search. They may be able to connect you to that person, so you can learn from their experience.

Most importantly, talk about your plans with your Co-op + Career Advisor. A place-bound job search is incredibly active – you may not be able to rely on WITworks in the same way as your peers. That is OKAY. Your advisor will have tips that are specific to your major and personal situation. We are here to support you – whatever your needs!

Rocket.Build Community Hackathon: Event Recap

By: Kristen Eckman

This past weekend, Wentworth CO-OPS + CAREERS hosted the Rocket.Build Community Hackathon inviting students from the Boston area to participate in a 32-hour long hacking challenge. Participants completed challenges and designed specific hacks based on the following themes:

Best Housing Hack

Best Transportation and Mobility Hack

Best Environmental Hack

Best Rising Water Impact Hack

Best Job Portal for Highly Skilled Immigrants Hack

Best Connecting Community to Hackathons Hack

The Rocket.Build Community Hackathon was made possible through partnership between Wentworth and Rocket Software along with significant support from faculty and student organizers from the Computer Science Society, HackWITus, and Accelerate.

Participants began hacking Saturday morning after an opening ceremony facilitated by Anjali Arora, Rocket Software Chief Product Officer. Throughout the two-day event Rocketeers, alongside Wentworth faculty and staff, volunteered their time to lead breakout sessions on topics including “Technical Interviewing”, “HTTP Servers & Databases”, and “Predicting Boston Housing Prices Using AI”.

 

RS Hackathon

 

Nearly one hundred students from eight Boston area colleges and universities attended the event, while 64 went on to present their hacks in teams to a panel of Rocket judges Sunday afternoon. Prizes were awarded based on the following categories:

Judges Pick for Community Build: Hyperdome – An anonymous help line with no fear of stigma or consequences.

Created by: Skyelar Craver, Steven Pitts

Environmental Hack: Trash Tag Tracker – Used the #trashtag movement to inspire reporting locations to be cleaned up.

Created by: Bruce Craig, Vincent Jodice, Andrew Bissel, Griffen Campbell, and Corey Everett

Connecting Community Hack: C Squared – A Portal to match volunteers with non-profits.

Created by: Damian Barrows, Mason Osborn, Joe Schnachert, Keidon London, and Simon Wang

Rising Water Hack: Waterfront – Educate Boston residents on susceptibility to flooding.

Created by: Ethan Arrowood, Julia Connor, and Colin Hennessy

Housing Hack: Homefront – Site for user submitted information on homes for safety.

Created by: Gia Hill, Ryan Clonrety, and Yali Izzo

Special Award for Resilience: Green Posh –  They lost 2 of 5 members during the night! Empower reduced consumption.

Created by: Nate Bland, Teddy Gadie, and Camille Calabrese

Check out all hacks submitted here: https://rs-hackathon-2019.devpost.com/submissions

 

RS Hackathon

 

The event was a robust experience and recruiting opportunity as students applied their academic and creative problem-solving skills, interacted with Rocket Software staff (mentors, hiring managers, HR professionals) and persevered under a demanding deadline with little sleep. All students gained experience to build their skill set (and resumes) and five co-op opportunities were awarded to Wentworth students!

Technical skills strengthened by hacking:

  • Team formation, collaboration and management
  • Public presentation skills
  • Research, ideation and problem solving
  • Honed programming skills in coding languages
  • Used new software programming tools
  • Built servers, websites and apps
  • Designed complex databases
  • Applied high level math
  • Used AI/Machine Learning for predictive modelling

RS Hacking

 

Thank you to all who participated and volunteered this weekend to make The Rocket.Build Community Hackathon a success! Stay tuned for more events like this one. Keep up-to-date through our Events Page.

 

Check out what Rocket Software had to say about their experience at Wentworth:

ROCKET.BUILD COMMUNITY: A NEW GLOBAL TRADITION

MENTORING AT THE FIRST ROCKET.BUILD COMMUNITY HACKATHON

 

More photos from the event can be found here.

Co-op Stories: Sarah Higgins, Computer Science

Sarah Higgins is a current Wentworth student majoring in Computer Science. Here’s what Sarah shared with us about her co-op experience:

 

Where was your co-op? What was your job title? & What interested you in this company/the role?

My first co-op was with Jibo as a Build Tools Software Engineer.  I only knew that I liked writing code and problem solving, and I knew there were teams at the company that would provide me with opportunities to get better at both.  I lucked out with Jibo because I was not only reassured of my choice to go back to school for Computer Science, but my mentor and the people I got to work with were incredible.

My second co-op was with Validity.  Although very different from Jibo, I knew that they were looking for a software engineer to complete tasks similar to what I had worked on at Jibo, so I applied and luckily got the job.  I also intentionally wanted to take on a role in a different type of work culture environment to see if it would help me figure out what I like more in a company environment for when I graduate.

 

What got you interested in Software Engineering?

I took a Computer Science course while I was majoring in Mechanical Engineering and loved it!!  The puzzles and problems we got to solve, learning about logic gates, and basic programs written in Java came easy to me.

I have been a hairstylist for the past 10 years and I knew that I always wanted to go back to school, but it’d have to be worth the investment.  A few of my friends are mechanical engineers and after talking with them about what their jobs are like, I thought I’d like it and wanted to give it a try.  After learning that it takes almost a semester’s worth of time to see what feels like an ounce of progress, I realized I hated it.  Coming from an industry where the longest I’m with a client is about 3 hours, that wasn’t going to cut it.  Solving problems in as little as 30 seconds with writing programs and logic was far more fun, so I switched my major and dove in to a new found passion.

 

What did you need to focus on inside or outside of the classroom to be successful as a candidate?

Time management. While I was at school Monday – Friday seeking co-ops, I’d allot an hour each day to specifically apply for co-ops, which meant also writing a lot of cover letters.  For my first co-op, I think I sent out almost 45 applications.  I heard back from 5 companies for interviews, and I received 2 offers.  One was in Providence, and the other was Jibo here in Downtown Boston. Because Jibo was a shorter commute and the company product seemed way cooler, I accepted that one.

For my second co-op, I only had to apply to about 10 companies before I heard from Validity.  The second time around is much easier, as everyone told me.  Once you’ve gained professional experience, it’s not as stressful applying.

 

What was a typical day like at your co-op?

My typical day at both Validity and Jibo were very similar. I’d arrive at 9am every day and we’d have a daily stand-up.  Stand-up is a brief 5-10 minute meeting in which everyone on your specific software engineering team will say what they have accomplished since the last stand-up, currently working on, when they anticipate to have that completed by, and anything blocking progress from happening.

I’d then continue working on whatever project my mentor had assigned to me. It never took me more than a week or two to complete a project he would give me.  My mentor would check in with me frequently via Slack or by coming to my desk to see if I was stuck on anything, and always gave me feedback on whatever I was working on.

I’d be a part of meetings throughout the day, too.  Even though I was a co-op, I was treated like every other full-time working member of the team.  If the project that I was a part of required me to get more information from other members on the team or the manager, I’d be a part of the meeting to make sure I had everything to go forward.

Every two weeks, we’d have Sprint meetings.  Sprint meetings in software engineering allow for more long-term planning, typically two weeks away from where you’re at.  We assign projects and tickets to each member of the team and hopefully by the next sprint, all tasks are completed. They almost never were though because Jibo was a start-up, and start-ups demand that everyone take on more than what falls into their realm of responsibility sometimes.  That’s okay though, because it was always fun and felt great to know that I could be responsible for more work than the team expected from me!

Student on-site

While on co-op, what project(s) were you a part of, or something that you worked on, that has inspired you?

At Jibo, I was a part of the Build Tools team.  Build tools I’ve learned are an important and valued discipline in Software Engineering because it gets the products built, deployed, shipped, and its version number is incremented and ready for the next build.  A lot of software exists to help make that process easier, and only require a script from the programmer to tell the build what to do.  At Validity, I wrote the company’s first automated build script on my own, because I did a lot of work similar to it at Jibo.

At Jibo however, we needed to automate the entire process, which was incredibly complicating.  Because Jibo was a robot built with custom hardware that was being turned into its own platform, my mentor and I were responsible for creating the entire build process to communicate with the robot.  A software service would not be able to do that.  Learning all about what went into a “starting-from-scratch” automation process to deploy software was a life changing experience that made me appreciate the industry side of software building because while writing code, you need to make sure that all of the libraries you choose will work together smoothly.

That project specifically took almost a month for us to complete. I realized how special that was while I was writing my build script at Validity, because it took less than a week’s time.  It felt pretty incredible to know that I not only knew all of the behind the scenes build process, but I was able to get it done on my own and thoroughly explain it to someone else properly.  I eventually became someone who was a go-to for questions about build software like Jenkins and CircleCI at Validity because of that, which felt amazing!

 

What was the biggest lesson you learned on co-op?

The biggest and most valuable lesson that I learned is that I can do it, and that I am capable. That might seem like a ridiculous answer, but it’s true. I was terrified going to my first co-op at Jibo, especially since the only “professional” experience I had ever had was in a completely different industry. I had to start over and be a beginner all over again in an industry I knew almost nothing about. I was lucky enough to have an incredible mentor who was also a phenomenal teacher and incredibly patient with me when I needed things explained more than once, but he always gave me all of the credit for whatever I’d figured out. By the end of my co-op, I was given tasks with hardly any instructions and at Validity, it was a lot of the same. It felt amazing being relied on and becoming someone who people could eventually ask questions to about their own work.

 

What advice do you have for students interested in software engineering?

Dive in and go for it! I was a hairstylist who was frustrated to be stuck in one place because my clientelle was built and established and you can’t bring them with you if you want to pick up and move to a different town, never mind a different state. Software engineering provides open doors almost everywhere, especially in bustling, big cities where there are a lot of companies working on really cool things!

Jibo was a social robot who would talk to us and say things like “Hi, I’m glad you’re here.  If you weren’t, I would be talking to myself right now”, and he was able to do that because of the software that my mentor and I had pushed up to him ourselves.  Everything that he’d say or do was because of the work we put into it. At Validity, I alongside another software engineering co-op, collaborated on creating and building a brand new website for their customers to keep track of their email accounts, in addition to many other projects like my build script.

Even though the two companies were vastly different, I got to work on projects with similar libraries and languages to allow me to further develop my own skills to carry with me wherever I’d end up next.  Right now, I am taking advantage of all of the Python skills I learned at both co-ops in two of my classes.  Prior to my co-ops, I had never worked with Python before.

My point is, do it. Just do it. There’s no better feeling in the world than solving a problem on your own, you feel like a wizard sitting at the computer. Seriously. If you want to learn how to write code, go for it.  It will be hard, but it’s so worth it. I love who I see when I look at myself in the mirror now, knowing that I am about to graduate with a new found career path and passion, and I did it all for myself.  Everybody deserves to know what that feels like.  Do it!

 

Thank you for sharing your experience with us, Sarah! Be on the lookout for our next co-op feature. If you would like to share your search process, co-op experience (positive or not-as-expected), or have any questions about the co-op process, please email us at coopsandcareers@wit.edu.

As always, to make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617.989.4101 or stop by the CO-OPS + CAREERS Office during Spring 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Co-op Learning Goals and Reflection

By: Kristen Eckman

Have you recently accepted a co-op offer? Congratulations! The next steps in the co-op process are to:

  1. Register for co-op on LeopardWeb

You must register for your co-op course on LeopardWeb just like you would for any other class. Make sure you select the correct section that corresponds to your major (see your Co-op Advisor if you are unsure of which one to select) and the correct course:

  • Co-op 3000 for an optional co-op (PRE-CO-OP WORK TERM)
  • Co-op 3500 for the first required co-op (COOP EDUCATION 1)
  • Co-op 4500 for the second required co-op (COOP EDUCATION 2)
  1. Report your hire on WITworks
  • Log on to WITworks using your WIT email and password.
  • In the left-hand menu select: “My Account” > “Co-op” > “Report Co-op Hire” OR “Add New”

In the Report of Hire, you must construct your Learning Goals for the semester. Please refer to our past blog written by Advisor, Sara Dell on How to Write Learning Goals for Co-op and Why if you are unsure of how to start.

target bullseye

Below are a few examples of Learning Goal topics grouped by major:

All Majors

  • write clearly and persuasively to communicate their scientific ideas clearly
  • test hypotheses and draw correct inferences using quantitative analysis
  • evaluate theory and critique research within the discipline

Sciences

  • apply critical thinking and analytical skills to interpreting scientific data sets
  • demonstrate written, visual, and/or oral presentation skills to communicate scientific knowledge
  • acquire and synthesize scientific information from a variety of sources
  • apply techniques and instrumentation to solve problems

Engineering

  • explain and demonstrate the role that analysis and modeling play in engineering design and engineering applications more generally
  • communicate about systems using mathematical, verbal and visual means
  • formulate mathematical models for physical systems by applying relevant conservation laws and assumptions
  • choose appropriate probabilistic models for a given problem, using information from observed data and knowledge of the physical system being studied
  • choose appropriate methods to solve mathematical models and obtain valid solutions

3. Go on co-op! Enjoy your semester and invest in your learning with goals in mind.

4. Reflect on your Learning Goals

Reflection can (and should) happen at any time throughout your co-op semester. Reflection is a way to engage deeper in your learning and will help you to absorb more from your work environment.

One way to begin the reflection process is to ask yourself questions:

  • What was a significant learning accomplishment for you this semester?
  • What did you discover about yourself as a learner (or social scientist, mathematician, engineer, problem solver or whatever the subject area)?
  • What was your favorite mistake and what did you learn from it?
  • What feedback did you get from your supervisor or colleagues that was important to you?
  • What are strengths you noticed about yourself?
  • What are next steps in your learning journey?
  • Looking ahead to the next semester (academic or co-op), what are some challenges you imagine?
  • What strengths can you bring to meet those challenges?

Keep in mind that there is no correct answer to these questions, rather use these as a guide to distinguish from what you hoped to learn, to what you actually learned and help you to develop your long-term career goals.

Girl career

For even more information on how to report and register for co-op, refer to our resource pages:

Co-op Action Guide

Registering for Co-op

As always, to make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617.989.4101 or stop by the CO-OPS + CAREERS Office during Spring 2019 Drop-In Hours:

Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Advice from a Recruiter with Kyle Greenleaf from JLL

By: Ria Kalinowski

Assistant Director, Abbey Pober and I recently sat down with Kyle Greenleaf, a recruiter from JLL, to talk about their hiring processes. Kyle focuses on recruiting for industrial facilities management with a focus mainly on life science clients. JLL is a property consultancy company specializing in property services and investment management. In the past, they have posted both full and part-time positions on WITworks for students with degrees in Architecture, Business Management, and Construction Management.

Kyle looks at hundreds of resumes on a weekly basis. Customization of your resume is ESSENTIAL if you want to stand out.

What does he look for?

  • 50% prior relevant work experience
  • 50% what makes YOU unique

When recruiting for co-op or entry-level positions, Kyle understands that you probably won’t have much relevant work experience. He will definitely look at any prior co-ops and relevant academic projects, but soft skills are hugely important. He is looking for breadth of experience rather than depth of experience. Interpersonal, communication, and leadership skills are good to emphasize but it’s more important to know YOUR strengths and focus on those. Your experiences and your personality make you unique so don’t be afraid to highlight those aspects of yourself.

Huge positive flags for Kyle are volunteer experience and involvement in athletics. Unless your experience is additive or really exceptional, leave off musical instruments, drama involvement, and other outside interests.

 

What should students do to build their resume?

Kyle’s advice is to find ways to practice leadership skills: start a club, become a club president, volunteer for something new, etc. Every single day you should do one thing that terrifies you or pushes you out of your comfort zone.

Ways to do that at Wentworth include taking Leadership Institute, applying to become a student leader, attending Speakeasy (a public speaking practice forum that meets Mondays at noon in Accelerate), getting involved with Accelerate or EPIC, or joining or starting a club.

 

What if a student doesn’t have any experience?

For students with little or no experience Kyle advises them to “show up” to the CO-OP + CAREER Fair to get in front of hiring managers as a great starting point. Do research about the company to show your interest. Employers will inevitably ask, “what do you know about us?” or “what made you stop by our booth today?” and having a comprehensive answer will give you a great advantage. Start networking as soon as possible. Find someone in your major who is a senior and take them to lunch. Ask them what they regret not doing or are glad they took advantage of. Reach out to alumni to ask about their career choices and learn about possible career paths.

 

Kyle’s Quick Tips

  • Customize Your Application: Make sure your resume and cover letter show why you are a good fit for that particular position at that specific company.
  • You have 7 Seconds to make a good first impression: Smile, have a strong handshake, and practice your professional introduction.
  • Do Your Research: Whether you are writing a cover letter, heading to an interview, or attending a career fair, find out what the company does and determine why you are interested in them.
  • Write (Good!) Cover Letters: They are necessary to help sell your experience and how you fit the position. If 6 people apply and 5 people write a cover letter and you don’t, you aren’t getting the interview.
  • Reach out to Recruiters on LinkedIn: Send a connection request with this message, “I saw that JLL had an operations role posted and when I searched for recruiters at JLL, your name popped up. I’m not sure if you are specifically the right person to contact for this role, but I’d love to speak with you about it if you are. If you aren’t the right person, perhaps you could you point me in the right direction.”

 

Most Important Take Away

Kyle wants to remind all applicants to be passionate about the company and the position and show that passion! This is something I’ve heard from so many recruiters and hiring managers. The best employees understand the company’s mission and goals and have a strong passion for them. Recruiters don’t want to hire someone who wants A job, they want to hire someone who wants the SPECIFIC job they are hiring for. Contact your Co-op + Career Advisor for help with writing your cover letter and customizing answers to interview questions to show your passion.

 

To hear the entire conversation, check out the WITworks Radio Show here.

 

To make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617 989 4101 or stop by during Spring 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Event Recap: Spring 2019 CO-OP + CAREER Fair

By: Abbey Pober

Our annual Spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair was held on Tuesday, March 19th from 3:00 pm – 7:00 pm in Tansey Gymnasium. The event drew 175 employers ranging from innovative biomedical engineering firms to international high-tech organizations and everything in between. Over 700 students from all majors, seeking both co-op and full-time opportunities, spent the afternoon networking at the Fair. Students came prepared to learn and make new connections, like Cilviano who attended with an intention to step out of his comfort zone “This year I’m going to companies that intimidate me. Just be fearless.”

Student at CCF

Students who attended the CO-OP + CAREER Fair, below are some tips for following up. If you had a LinkedIn photo taken, look for an email from coopsandcareers@wit.edu in about a month.

  • Send a thank you email to the employers with whom you spoke. Find our guide to thank you notes here. If you need a reminder of which companies with whom you spoke a list of employers is available on our website for reference.
  • If a recruiter gave you specific instructions, be sure to follow through on those items and then follow up with the recruiter.
  • Use this opportunity to include a copy of your resume, even if you gave them one at the Fair.
  • Unable to send a thank-you note for lack of contact information? Stay connected through social media: find the company or even the person you spoke with on LinkedIn or Twitter. Follow their feeds to stay up to date on new openings and other news!
  • You are always welcome to check in with your Co-op + Career Advisor to see if they can provide you with any helpful information, too.

If you were unable to attend the Fair this spring be on the lookout for future opportunities to connect with employers, including the announcement about the fall CO-OP + CAREER Fair. Check WITworks as we get closer to the fall Fair for updates on employers attending. Employers be on the lookout for future recruiting opportunities in the coming months, and for details about our fall semester events including the CO-OP + CAREER Fair and Mock Interview Day.

Thank you to all students and employers who joined on March 19th for the Fair. A special thank you to our sponsors: BOND Brothers, Commodore Builders, DACON, Electric Supply Center, JLL, NOVO Construction, Schneider Electric, and TG Gallagher. Your support makes all the difference.

We look forward to seeing everyone at our next event!

How to Work the CO-OP + CAREER Fair

How to WORK the Career Fair – An approach for everyone, whether you are low-key or EXTRA!

Low Key Approach

EXTRA Approach
RESEARCH •   Find the list of employers attending on the “Jobs and Careers” App and research the ones of interest.

•   See if they have positions posted so you can research more about the companies ahead of the fair.

•      Create a spreadsheet, categorizing employers into A, B, and C lists.

•      Write down a few questions you might ask them at the fair. Refer to these questions before each conversation.

RESUME •   Write, review, and edit your resume.

•   Come to Drop-Ins to make sure it is ready for the Career Fair.

•   Print out 10-20 copies and tuck them in a folder to hand out to employers.

•      Make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor to go over your Resume.

•      Print 10-20 copies and carry them in a professional padfolio.

•      Make your own business cards.

PLAN •   The plan is to go, shake hands, meet employers, ask good questions, and hand out resumes.  Go with it!

 

•      Locate the employer booths on the Fairs App ahead of time and map out your route.

•      Maybe talk to a couple employers on your C list to start before moving on to your first choices!

DRESS •   Gather your professional attire.

•   Visit WITwear to borrow any items you may need!

 

•      Iron, steam, fresh haircut!  Look your best.

•      Also…visit WITwear to borrow any items you need.

PITCH •   Build a 30 second pitch and practice it in the mirror so you come across relaxed and professional.

•   Practice a firm handshake.

 

•      Record yourself and critique yourself.  Be mindful of eye contact, fidgets, and filler (“um, like”).

•      Pitch with a friend and practice your handshakes.

THANK YOU •   Shake employers’ hand and thank them for their time answering your questions and speaking to you.

 

•   Collect business cards so you can write thank you notes the next day.

•   If they requested your application electronically – email them to let them know you applied.

 

Check out ALL our helpful guides on resumes, networking, pitches, and more on our website: https://wit.edu/coopsandcareers/cooperative-education/co-op-resources

Download the new WITworks App: Symplicity Jobs and Careers App:

Apple App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/symplicity-jobs-and-careers/id1239828027?mt=8

Google Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.symplicity.csmandroid&hl=en_US

Image of a smiling leopard.
TFW you nail the CO-OP + CAREER Fair

Special Co-ops and Careers Fair All Day Resume Drop-Ins:  Thurs 3/14 & Fri 3/15

Weekly Drop-In Schedule: M, T, W from 1:30-4:30pm

Make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor: call the front desk at (617) 989 4101

WITwear Hours: M, T, W 4 – 8pm, Th 5-8pm & F 10am – Noon

What to Pair From WITwear

Watch as Kristen Eckman, Operations Coordinator and Lauren Rodolakis, Marketing Intern at CO-OPS + CAREERS share examples of what to match from our WITwear professional clothes borrowing closet.

 

Spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair is Tuesday, March 19th! For events leading up to Career Fair, check out our Prep Week Schedule.

To make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617 989 4101 or stop by during spring 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuedsday, and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Applicant Tracking Systems and Professional Summaries

By Ria Kalinowski

When applying to full-time positions outside of WITworks, seniors and alumni need to tailor their resumes to each position they apply for to get their application past the Applicant Tracking System and into the hands of a human. Using a professional summary is a quick and easy way to do that!

 

What is an Applicant Tracking System (ATS)?

Almost every large company and many smaller companies use ATS software to scan, sort, and filter applicant resumes. Applicants are then ranked according to how they match the key words that employers are looking for. Customizing your resume is key in order to get your resume seen.

ATS Visula

 

Basic tips for beating an ATS

  • Keep formatting simple so the ATS can more easily scan your resume and match your skills with the correct dates.
  • Use standard headings such as “Education” and “Experience” so the ATS isn’t confused.
  • Avoid using tables, headers, and columns as these can cause errors within the ATS.
  • A PDF file is not compatible with all types of ATS software. Read the directions carefully when submitting your resume and unless “PDF” is listed among the file types accepted, stick to a Word document or plain-text file.
  • Use a Professional Summary as an additional way to include those key words employers are looking for and a quick way to tailor each resume you submit.

 

How to Write a Professional Summary

  • Where does it go:
    • Include your professional summary directly below your contact information so this is the first section employers see.
  • What does it look like:
    • Name your professional summary the title of the position you are applying for as long as it accurately represents your skills and experience or check out the summaries below for additional ideas.
    • Keep it brief! Limit your summary to 3-5 statements and avoid using “I” and other personal pronouns.
    • Use several statements in a paragraph form or a bulleted list.
  • What to include:
    • Optimize your keywords to be found! Include the job title you are applying for and the technical and transferable skills you possess that they ask for in the job description. Pay careful attention to words that are repeated often and try to include those in your summary and/or elsewhere on your resume.
    • Highlight your skills and experience that are directly related to the position that you are applying for.
    • Include major accomplishments and use numbers whenever possible.
    • Look at the positions you are applying for and use language directly from those job descriptions when appropriate.

ATS Visual

 

Additional ATS Resources:

How the Top 5 Applicant Tracking Systems Read Resumes Differently.

8 Things You Need to Know About Applicant Tracking Systems.

 

Sample Resume Summaries:

DevOps ENGINEER

Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Engineering with 6 months work experience in building and testing video platforms. Strong programming skills in C, Java, and Python. Comprehensive debugging and troubleshooting skills. Proven ability to engineer complex solutions for scaling environments.

 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER

Electrical Engineering graduate with a year of industry experience. Strong interest in power systems with demonstrated knowledge of building science and energy efficiency. Strengths include use of SolidWorks and AutoCAD when reading and editing project drawings. Proven ability to collaborate with multidisciplinary teams.

 

PROJECT MANAGER

Business Management student with 9 months of print project management experience and knowledge of web production obtained from internships in educational publishing and consumer packaging. Creative problem solver who has consistently completed projects on time and within budget. Employed a customer-focused approach which increased repeat business by 15% over the prior cycle. Available September 2019.

 

MECHANICAL ENGINEER

Results oriented mechanical engineer focused on design, prototyping, analysis, testing, documentation, and manufacturing support. Experienced in the fabrication of mechanical components, complex systems and mechanical devices. Strengths include:

  • SolidWorks for mechanical design
  • AutoCAD for process design
  • Rapid prototyping
  • New product development and introduction
  • Lean manufacturing

 

IT SPECIALIST

Wentworth Institute of Technology student offering a strong foundation in IT combined with 6 months of internship experience. Proven track record of providing Tier 1 & 2 support both in-person and remotely using ServiceNow. Skilled in explaining technical issues to non-technical end users. Experience with migration projects for both Macs and Windows. Creative troubleshooter with a customer service mindset.

 

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEER

Class of 2019 with minors in Manufacturing and Biology. More than a year of experience in the medical device industry. Strong interest in manufacturing and working knowledge of new and upcoming medical devices such as orthopedics, implants, and prosthetics.

 

CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER

Results-driven construction and project manager with 8 months of management experience and 1+ years of experience in the construction industry. Skilled at comprehending and interpreting architectural and civil blueprint plans especially using Bluebeam. Experience with, or exposure to, various construction management situations including scheduling, contracts, problem reporting and resolution, management of subcontractors and site safety.

 

Spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair is Tuesday, March 19th! For events leading up to Career Fair, check out our Prep Week Schedule.

To make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617 989 4101 or stop by during spring 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuedsday, and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:00pm while classes are in session.

Mindfulness and Your Career

By: Kristen Eckman

This week on WIRE Radio, the CO-OPS + CAREERS team sat down with Bridget McNamee, Associate Director of the Center for Wellness and Disability Services to talk about mindfulness as it relates to your career. Listen to the WITworks radio episode on demand, anytime here.

Cartoon about mindulfness

To better understand the topic of mindfulness, we asked Bridget the following questions:

What is the difference between mindfulness and meditation?

Mindfulness is defined as “the awareness that arises through paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally,” (Kabat Zinn)

Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment, through a gentle, nurturing lens. (https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/mindfulness/definition).  You can practice mindfulness anywhere at any time with anyone by simply being present and engaged in the here and now.

Meditation is an intentional and inward practice of mindfulness. Kabat Zinn says meditation is a systematic form of paying attention.

Ways to practice mindfulness include:

  1. Integrated mindfulness. Try bringing more awareness to your day-to-day.

By brushing your teeth:

Pay attention to the taste and texture of the toothpaste; mindful of the sensation of your feet on the bathroom floor; mindful of the way that your arm moves to direct the brush across your teeth; mindful of each and every tooth.

Or standing in line:

You set off mindful and quietly prepared for what you’ll need; mindful of how your mood changes when you first catch a glimpse of the line at the dining hall; mindful of how you stand, your breath and where any tensions are as you scan through your body; mindful of the tendency to distract yourself from the present moment; and mindful of how you interact with the people around you.

2. Dedicated-set aside time each day to practice meditation.

Think of your brain like a wild horse. Let your thoughts run and then rein them in a little, let them run and then rein them in a little more, and keep continue this process until you are focused.

Start with trying this for 2 minutes every day and slowly build up.  Your mind WILL wander and all you need to do is notice that your mind has wondered. Do not judge yourself for it, just notice and bring it back, notice and bring it back.

Counting breaths can help (in for 3 seconds out for 3 seconds up to 10 breaths and then start over). You can also use visualization strategies. Imagine each breath brings in the warmth of the sun starting at the tips of your toes and work your way up to the top of your head through breath.

Brain strength workout

There’s a lot of reference to the present when talking about mindfulness/meditation.  Why is being present so important?

A Harvard study found that people spend 46.9% of their time thinking about things other than what they are doing. They’re thinking about what happened in the past, what will happen in the future, and what might never happen. This has a detrimental effect. The study found a direct correlation to the amount of time not focused on the present and the level of unhappiness or dissatisfaction.  The brain is wired to scan for threats and anticipate danger, a trait leftover from early evolution.  This default to the negative combined with too much dwelling on the past or anticipating the future is a recipe for unhappiness.

A regular mindfulness/meditation practice can rewire the brain.  A Harvard study showed an increase in gray matter in different parts of the brain that control learning and memory, emotional regulation, focus and concentration, perspective taking and empathy, and stress response. This was found among study participants who practiced mindfulness an average of 27 minutes/day over 8 weeks. Long story short, treat mindfulness like you treat exercise; a little bit most days of the week can make you stronger and healthier and better equipped to handle.

The key to this is regular practice-the same results have not been shown for people who practice mindfulness sporadically. While 27 minutes seems like a lot (and it is!), there is some evidence that even 10 minutes/day can produce results. More research is needed to confirm brain changes but study participants report positive results after daily 10 minute sessions.

Are the benefits of mindfulness physical, emotional, social, or all of the above?

All of the above!  We already talked about how it can change the brain, but it can also change the body.  A regular mindfulness practice boosts serotonin (the happiness chemical), melatonin (the sleep chemical), and endorphins (the feel good chemical) and reduces cortisol (the stress chemical).

Low serotonin has an impact on our mood and can be a symptom of depression; regular mindfulness practice increases serotonin and therefore creates a better environment for brain cells to do their job.

Melatonin is essential for recharging the body and enough melatonin is essential for sleep health, immunity, and healthy aging; regular meditation has been shown to increase melatonin levels by 98%!  We have to work extra hard for our melatonin these days because a primary enemy of melatonin production is light/screens and we all know how much we stare at screens now.

Endorphins cause that happy, Zen-like state of alertness and overall feel goodness; sometimes referred to as “runners high”. Meditation has been shown to have the same effect on endorphin levels as going for a long run.

Too much cortisol can cause inflammation, high blood pressure, brain fog, anxiety, etc. Regular mindfulness practice has shown to reduce cortisol levels by 50%!

What are some mindfulness tools I can bring to work?

“The Upside of Stress” by Kelly McGonigal discuses when you change your mind about stress, you change your bodies response to stress.

How do you change your mind about stress? Be present in your stress. Tune in and notice your bodies response to stress (racing heart, sweating, rapid breathing, etc.); notice your beating heart and think about how it is getting more oxygen to your brain to help you with this challenge, think about sweating as your bodies way to detox so you can more clearly tackle this issue, notice your rapid breathing and think about how it is reminding you to take in more air and silently start to count your breaths trying to make each breath a little longer than the last.

Think about all the other benefits we already talked about; better learning/memory, better emotional regulation, better ability to focus/concentrate, better perspective taking/empathy, and a better response to stress all come in handy in the workplace. If you can learn and retain, not scream at your coworkers, stay focused in meetings or while working on projects or with clients, and have a better sense of connection with people you are an asset to any work environment. And you’ll feel better!

For more information on mindfulness, check out the following resources:

Mindfulness Courses on Lynda.com (free with Wentworth network login)

https://www.lynda.com/Business-Skills-tutorials/Mindfulness/418268-2.html?org=wit.edu

https://www.lynda.com/Business-tutorials/Practicing-mindfulness-Its-all-about-meditation/751311/787321-4.html?org=wit.edu

Apps:

Calm
Headspace
10% Happier

Books:

The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor
The How of Happiness by Sonia Lyubomirsky
10% Happier by Dan Harris
Mindfulness for the Fidgety Skeptics by Dan Harris

People to Google:
Sharon Salzberg
John Kabat Zinn
Jack Kornfield

If you have questions about mindfulness and meditation, I encourage you to stop by The Center for Wellness and Disability Services, lower level Watson Hall.

Spring CO-OP + CAREER Fair is Tuesday, March 19th! For events leading up to Career Fair, check out our Prep Week Schedule.

To make an appointment with your Co-op + Career Advisor call the front desk at 617 989 4101 or stop by during spring 2019 Drop-In Hours: Monday, Tuedsday, and Wednesday 1:30pm – 4:0pm while classes are in session.